MySpace can now expel sex offenders

“Sex offenders have no business joining
social networking communities – especially
those with teenage users – and our
legislation will help keep them out.”

Social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook can now trace and expel potential sexual predators under new law requiring sex offenders to submit all identifying Internet information along with home addresses.

Under the law, signed yesterday by President George W. Bush, registered sex offenders must submit all e-mail addresses, instant messenger names or other online identifiers for inclusion in the National Sex Offender Registry.

The U.S. attorney general will make that information available on a database where approved Web sites can cross-check their users’ information and weed out any potential predators, said New York Sen. Charles Schumer, who introduced the original bill.

Under the law, sex offenders not providing all Internet information face the same penalty as those who fail to register their home address – up to 10 years in prison.

“Millions of teenagers log on to Web sites like MySpace and they, and their parents, shouldn’t have to worry about running in to these predators online,” Schumer said. “Sex offenders have no business joining social networking communities – especially those with teenage users – and our legislation will help keep them out.”

Many child advocacy groups and other social networking sites, including the American Family Association, MySpace and Facebook have also endorsed the legislation.

“We at Facebook are very pleased that Congress has acted to enhance sex offender reporting requirements and give us access to data that will supplement our robust safety systems,” said Chris Kelly, chief privacy officer at Facebook.

PROTECT Our Children Act – Passed Congress

Legislation to increase the ability of law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute child predators makes a major step forward.

We first told you about senate bill 17-38 last month. It’s now known as the ‘PROTECT Our Children Act.’

The bill passed Congress, and now it’s up to President Bush whether to sign it into law.

Callers from around the country recently flooded congressional offices demanding support of the PROTECT our Children Act. Many heard about it on Oprah, others on myspace blogs.

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Knoxville native David Keith, actor and member of the National Association to Protect Children, says, “We are ecstatic we have had this victory in Congress.”

Highlights of the passed bill include at least one Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force in each state and more than tripling their funding, better information-sharing between law enforcement agencies, and expanding computer forensics labs dedicated to crimes against children.

It also requires new criminal penalties for live child abuse feeds and for grafting images of real children onto sexual images to create child porn.

Police say the resources to find more physical evidence in computers would help investigators save more children from abuse.

Kentucky State Police trooper Jody Sims says, “It would just allow them to be trained in different areas to kind of go outside the scope of what they do now. Sometimes you have victims who don’t want to testify, and it would help to solidify those cases.”

Opponents of the bill say it would lead to too much bureaucracy and not enough prosecutors to handle new cases.
Officials say the deadline for the president to sign the bill is October 12th.

Increased funding for the FBI and other agencies was cut from the original bill.

To learn more about the PROTECT Our Children Act, go to http://www.thomas.gov and search for senate bill 1738. You can also find an analysis of the bill at http://protect.org.

PROTECT Our Children Act – Passed Congress

Legislation to increase the ability of law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute child predators makes a major step forward.

We first told you about senate bill 17-38 last month. It’s now known as the ‘PROTECT Our Children Act.’

The bill passed Congress, and now it’s up to President Bush whether to sign it into law.

Callers from around the country recently flooded congressional offices demanding support of the PROTECT our Children Act. Many heard about it on Oprah, others on myspace blogs.

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‘);

Knoxville native David Keith, actor and member of the National Association to Protect Children, says, “We are ecstatic we have had this victory in Congress.”

Highlights of the passed bill include at least one Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force in each state and more than tripling their funding, better information-sharing between law enforcement agencies, and expanding computer forensics labs dedicated to crimes against children.

It also requires new criminal penalties for live child abuse feeds and for grafting images of real children onto sexual images to create child porn.

Police say the resources to find more physical evidence in computers would help investigators save more children from abuse.

Kentucky State Police trooper Jody Sims says, “It would just allow them to be trained in different areas to kind of go outside the scope of what they do now. Sometimes you have victims who don’t want to testify, and it would help to solidify those cases.”

Opponents of the bill say it would lead to too much bureaucracy and not enough prosecutors to handle new cases.
Officials say the deadline for the president to sign the bill is October 12th.

Increased funding for the FBI and other agencies was cut from the original bill.

To learn more about the PROTECT Our Children Act, go to http://www.thomas.gov and search for senate bill 1738. You can also find an analysis of the bill at http://protect.org.

Protect Our Children Act of 2008

Waters said studies indicate 30 to 40 percent of people who view child pornography online are child molesters, that the images make them feel OK about what they’re doing, as if it’s normal because so many other people are doing it too. They sometimes even share tips about how to do it and how to avoid being caught.

Last Monday “The Oprah Winfrey Show” focused on child molestation, providing gut-wrenching detail about how pervasive child pornography trafficking has become in America.

A Cheyenne man, Flint Waters, commander of the Wyoming Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, spoke about new technology that allows his task force to track child pornography images being sent online.

He said 15,000 such images are traded online every day, and that in the past two years 300,000 to 500,000 computers in the United States have sent such images.

Waters said studies indicate 30 to 40 percent of people who view child pornography online are child molesters, that the images make them feel OK about what they’re doing, as if it’s normal because so many other people are doing it too. They sometimes even share tips about how to do it and how to avoid being caught.

The good news is that such task forces exist now in every state, so that Waters can send tips about the most prolific traffickers to them for investigation.

But because there are so many offenders, the task forces can’t go after them all.

A bill now before the Senate, the Protect Our Children Act of 2008, also known as the “Protecting Children from Pornography and Internet Exploitation Act of 2008,” would start a five-year effort to increase the ability of those task forces to respond to the problem.

It would establish a National Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program, provide training to local and state task forces and increase their abilities to conduct investigations.

The Senate bill would seek $320 million over the next five years to fund increased law enforcement investigations of child exploitation.

Winfrey said she wants the Senate to declare war on child pornography and molestation, and asked viewers to pressure the Senate to pass the bill before it goes into recess on Sept. 26.

Dedicating $1.6 billion to declare a war to protect our children would be a worthy and timely investment.

Protect Our Children Act of 2008

Waters said studies indicate 30 to 40 percent of people who view child pornography online are child molesters, that the images make them feel OK about what they’re doing, as if it’s normal because so many other people are doing it too. They sometimes even share tips about how to do it and how to avoid being caught.

Last Monday “The Oprah Winfrey Show” focused on child molestation, providing gut-wrenching detail about how pervasive child pornography trafficking has become in America.

A Cheyenne man, Flint Waters, commander of the Wyoming Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, spoke about new technology that allows his task force to track child pornography images being sent online.

He said 15,000 such images are traded online every day, and that in the past two years 300,000 to 500,000 computers in the United States have sent such images.

Waters said studies indicate 30 to 40 percent of people who view child pornography online are child molesters, that the images make them feel OK about what they’re doing, as if it’s normal because so many other people are doing it too. They sometimes even share tips about how to do it and how to avoid being caught.

The good news is that such task forces exist now in every state, so that Waters can send tips about the most prolific traffickers to them for investigation.

But because there are so many offenders, the task forces can’t go after them all.

A bill now before the Senate, the Protect Our Children Act of 2008, also known as the “Protecting Children from Pornography and Internet Exploitation Act of 2008,” would start a five-year effort to increase the ability of those task forces to respond to the problem.

It would establish a National Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program, provide training to local and state task forces and increase their abilities to conduct investigations.

The Senate bill would seek $320 million over the next five years to fund increased law enforcement investigations of child exploitation.

Winfrey said she wants the Senate to declare war on child pornography and molestation, and asked viewers to pressure the Senate to pass the bill before it goes into recess on Sept. 26.

Dedicating $1.6 billion to declare a war to protect our children would be a worthy and timely investment.