Jeffrey Brisson – Baby Raper – Faces 100 new charges


Police said they have identified more underage victims of sexual abuse by a 30-year-old man already charged with sexually assaulting several children.

Jeffrey Brisson, who lived at an apartment on Washington Street, faces more than 100 new counts of sexual assault and risk of injury to a minor.

Investigators identified new victims after combing through computer-related evidence seized from Brisson’s apartment in January. Police continue investigating the identities of more potential victims and said they expect to file additional charges.

Brisson and his roommate, Harold Spurling, were arrested in January during a raid of their apartment that was prompted by a tip and evidence that the suspects had sexually assaulted a 14-year-old boy, police said.

They were charged with multiple counts of first-degree sexual assault and risk of injury to a minor, as well as tampering with evidence and interfering with a search warrant. It was unclear Tuesday whether Spurling would face additional charges.

Officers arrived at their apartment with a search warrant in time to stop the men from encrypting the child pornography on their computer, police have said. They also found a 3-month-old girl in the apartment and a video of one of the suspects sexually assaulting her, police said.

The girl is the daughter of an acquaintance of the suspects. She was taken to a hospital for a medical exam and then released to her mother, police said.

Anyone with information regarding Brisson or Spurling is asked to call New Britain police at 860-826-3065.

Published in: on October 10, 2008 at 3:34 pm  Leave a Comment  

Principal Mindy Garber – Charged with failing to report child sexual abuse

The principal at Hugh K. Cassell Elementary School has been charged with a misdemeanor after reportedly failing to notify authorities of a child sexual abuse allegation against a county school bus driver in April, according to the superintendent of Augusta County Public Schools.

Principal Mindy Garber is charged under a Virginia statute that states a school employee, public or private, must report any child abuse allegation within 72 hours.

Superintendent Gary McQuain said the issue came to light about three weeks ago when a county bus driver was under investigation by the Augusta County Sheriff’s Office on an allegation he inappropriately touched a student several years ago. It was during the investigation that Garber reported the earlier incident to officials, McQuain said.

In April, according to McQuain, there was an allegation that the same bus driver inappropriately touched a school student. The case, unrelated to the recent sheriff’s investigation, prompted Garber to speak with the alleged victim’s mother. Together, Garber and the mother of the child concluded there was no wrongdoing on the bus driver’s part, but nobody in the school system or Child Protective Services was notified.

“There are no options. She should have called,” McQuain said.

Garber, in her third year as principal at Cassell, has reported child abuse allegations in the past, McQuain said. “Ninety-nine percent of the time she called. This time she didn’t.”

Garber remains at the helm of the school while the court case plays out, and McQuain had nothing but praise for the principal.

“She’s a very, very good principal, and she defends these kids with all her heart,” he said.

As media reports surfaced today about the misdemeanor charge against Garber, McQuain said he expected some irate phone calls from parents, but none came.

“That speaks volumes,” he said.

According to the statute under which Garber was charged, she faces the possibility of a $500 fine.

The school bus driver was not charged by sheriff’s investigators but was cited by CPS, McQuain said. His position has since been terminated.

Richard Hosier – Repeat Sex Offender Civil Commitment

With a history of sex assault since he was a teen, Hosier has admitted to raping about 30 women and children during the late 1970s and early 1980s, often picking up hitchhikers and assaulting them.

A King County jury has ruled that convicted sex offender Richard Hosier should remain confined until state psychiatrists decide he’s no longer a threat to the community.


At Walla Walla and at Monroe, Richard Hosier was a model prisoner, an example to other sex offenders who had found their way behind bars.

But once he was released in Snohomish County, deputies arrested him, saying he gloried in using sex as a weapon against girls. He’d been dropping notes laden with sexual imagery for children to find.

To prosecutors, he represents a special case: a sexual predator so dangerous that he should be locked up with others like him in a treatment center even though his prison sentence has ended.

Prosecutors are asking a King County jury to send Hosier, 61, to a state Department of Social and Health Services treatment center on McNeil Island, where he would remained confined until death or rehabilitation through the state “civil commitment” system.

For most offenders taken into the 18-year-old program, such a move amounts to a life sentence. For the public, civil commitment is supposed to protect them from violent predators.

And now, a case where a jury rejected civil commitment stands for some as the ultimate example of why people such as Hosier must be locked up.

Like Hosier, Curtis Thompson faced civil commitment. But a jury refused in 2003 to commit him, and now Thompson faces a murder charge.

Less than a year after the state released Thompson, he started committing crimes, prosecutors say.

Thompson is accused of accosting four women in a weeks-long spree, killing one. He’s currently facing the first of three trials, for which a conviction could send him to prison for the rest of his life under the state “two strikes” law applied to sex predators who reoffend.

Civil commitment proceedings are rare, with about a dozen being filed each year in King County. By comparison, county prosecutors filed 640 felony counts against accused sex criminals in 2007, up from 441 the previous year.

Thompson’s outcome stands in contrast to the civil commitment system’s record of success, said Steve Williams of the Department of Social and Health Services, which administers the civil commitment program.

Treatment through the program doesn’t come cheaply for Washington taxpayers, costing the state $45 million in 2007, roughly $169,200 per offender. But, since its inception, none of the offenders involved has reoffended outside the secure facility.

“It was the jury that made the decision that he did not meet the criteria for civil commitment,” Williams said of Thompson. “We would have recommended that he stay with us.”

Of the 335 sex offenders who have entered the program, only two have been fully released. A third, Gary Cherry of Mason County, is scheduled to appear in court later this year to petition for release.

Several offenders have been placed at halfway houses in South Seattle or on McNeil Island, Williams said. None of those has reoffended in the community, in part because the offenders are returned to the secure facility if they appear to be backsliding.

“Any indication that they may be slipping up, we yank them out of the transition facility and put them back in the secure unit,” Williams said.

The program has its detractors, chief among them the U.S. District Court in Seattle.

The commitment center was placed under court supervision in 1994 after a federal judge agreed in part with a complaint filed by a group of offenders who claimed that the facility was simply a prison by another name.

U.S. District Judge Ricardo Martinez ended that oversight in March 2007, finding that the state was offering an adequate amount of psychiatric treatment. But, in his ruling, he continued to express concerns about the problem posed by sex offenders who had served their sentences but continue to threaten society.

“This case is most troublesome to the court in that there seems to be no right answer, and no good fix for the situation these plaintiffs face,” Martinez said in his ruling.

For prosecutors, the civil commitment system offers a tool to prevent offenders like Thompson from doing more damage.

Under the law, only repeat offenders with a psychiatric predisposition toward sex assault can be committed.

Prosecutors use the system when they look to put away people such as Hosier and Michael Atkins, a sex offender against whom civil commitment papers were filed earlier in September.

Atkins, 56, was scheduled to be released from prison Monday after completing a 10-year sentence. He pleaded guilty to charges related to the molestation of a 6-year-old girl.

That assault followed a string of sex crime convictions dating to the early 1980s, when Atkins was accused of raping two South Seattle girls.

But convicts can’t be locked away indefinitely simply because their crimes are heinous, or they themselves are repugnant, said Robin Price, a public defender representing Hosier.

“Without a doubt, Richard Hosier is a disgusting and repulsive individual,” Price told the King County jury Thursday. “There’s no one in this room who would dispute that.”

But, she said, her client isn’t a high risk to reoffend and could be treated outside the walls of the McNeil Island center.

That argument, one often made in civil commitment trials, could be a tough sell to a jury whose faces blanched as prosecutors recited in graphic detail the litany of sex crimes of which Hosier has been convicted.

With a history of sex assault since he was a teen, Hosier has admitted to raping about 30 women and children during the late 1970s and early 1980s, often picking up hitchhikers and assaulting them.

Most recently, he was convicted of leaving sexually explicit notes at several locations around Snohomish County, including a day care center.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Richard Hosier – Repeat Sex Offender Civil Commitment

With a history of sex assault since he was a teen, Hosier has admitted to raping about 30 women and children during the late 1970s and early 1980s, often picking up hitchhikers and assaulting them.

A King County jury has ruled that convicted sex offender Richard Hosier should remain confined until state psychiatrists decide he’s no longer a threat to the community.


At Walla Walla and at Monroe, Richard Hosier was a model prisoner, an example to other sex offenders who had found their way behind bars.

But once he was released in Snohomish County, deputies arrested him, saying he gloried in using sex as a weapon against girls. He’d been dropping notes laden with sexual imagery for children to find.

To prosecutors, he represents a special case: a sexual predator so dangerous that he should be locked up with others like him in a treatment center even though his prison sentence has ended.

Prosecutors are asking a King County jury to send Hosier, 61, to a state Department of Social and Health Services treatment center on McNeil Island, where he would remained confined until death or rehabilitation through the state “civil commitment” system.

For most offenders taken into the 18-year-old program, such a move amounts to a life sentence. For the public, civil commitment is supposed to protect them from violent predators.

And now, a case where a jury rejected civil commitment stands for some as the ultimate example of why people such as Hosier must be locked up.

Like Hosier, Curtis Thompson faced civil commitment. But a jury refused in 2003 to commit him, and now Thompson faces a murder charge.

Less than a year after the state released Thompson, he started committing crimes, prosecutors say.

Thompson is accused of accosting four women in a weeks-long spree, killing one. He’s currently facing the first of three trials, for which a conviction could send him to prison for the rest of his life under the state “two strikes” law applied to sex predators who reoffend.

Civil commitment proceedings are rare, with about a dozen being filed each year in King County. By comparison, county prosecutors filed 640 felony counts against accused sex criminals in 2007, up from 441 the previous year.

Thompson’s outcome stands in contrast to the civil commitment system’s record of success, said Steve Williams of the Department of Social and Health Services, which administers the civil commitment program.

Treatment through the program doesn’t come cheaply for Washington taxpayers, costing the state $45 million in 2007, roughly $169,200 per offender. But, since its inception, none of the offenders involved has reoffended outside the secure facility.

“It was the jury that made the decision that he did not meet the criteria for civil commitment,” Williams said of Thompson. “We would have recommended that he stay with us.”

Of the 335 sex offenders who have entered the program, only two have been fully released. A third, Gary Cherry of Mason County, is scheduled to appear in court later this year to petition for release.

Several offenders have been placed at halfway houses in South Seattle or on McNeil Island, Williams said. None of those has reoffended in the community, in part because the offenders are returned to the secure facility if they appear to be backsliding.

“Any indication that they may be slipping up, we yank them out of the transition facility and put them back in the secure unit,” Williams said.

The program has its detractors, chief among them the U.S. District Court in Seattle.

The commitment center was placed under court supervision in 1994 after a federal judge agreed in part with a complaint filed by a group of offenders who claimed that the facility was simply a prison by another name.

U.S. District Judge Ricardo Martinez ended that oversight in March 2007, finding that the state was offering an adequate amount of psychiatric treatment. But, in his ruling, he continued to express concerns about the problem posed by sex offenders who had served their sentences but continue to threaten society.

“This case is most troublesome to the court in that there seems to be no right answer, and no good fix for the situation these plaintiffs face,” Martinez said in his ruling.

For prosecutors, the civil commitment system offers a tool to prevent offenders like Thompson from doing more damage.

Under the law, only repeat offenders with a psychiatric predisposition toward sex assault can be committed.

Prosecutors use the system when they look to put away people such as Hosier and Michael Atkins, a sex offender against whom civil commitment papers were filed earlier in September.

Atkins, 56, was scheduled to be released from prison Monday after completing a 10-year sentence. He pleaded guilty to charges related to the molestation of a 6-year-old girl.

That assault followed a string of sex crime convictions dating to the early 1980s, when Atkins was accused of raping two South Seattle girls.

But convicts can’t be locked away indefinitely simply because their crimes are heinous, or they themselves are repugnant, said Robin Price, a public defender representing Hosier.

“Without a doubt, Richard Hosier is a disgusting and repulsive individual,” Price told the King County jury Thursday. “There’s no one in this room who would dispute that.”

But, she said, her client isn’t a high risk to reoffend and could be treated outside the walls of the McNeil Island center.

That argument, one often made in civil commitment trials, could be a tough sell to a jury whose faces blanched as prosecutors recited in graphic detail the litany of sex crimes of which Hosier has been convicted.

With a history of sex assault since he was a teen, Hosier has admitted to raping about 30 women and children during the late 1970s and early 1980s, often picking up hitchhikers and assaulting them.

Most recently, he was convicted of leaving sexually explicit notes at several locations around Snohomish County, including a day care center.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Entire Family rapes 3 year old

During her testimony she said she initially allowed her husband to have sex with their daughter because she was pregnant.

According to Krystal Jordan, the 3-year-old cried so much the second time she was assaulted that she was given pain killers to prevent the noise.

Three Lafayette County men were found guilty Tuesday of raping a 3-year-old girl in 2005.

Timothy Jordan, 38, the child’s father who was charged with five counts of rape, was convicted of all but one count.

Brothers Glen Grose, 40, and Johnny Grose, 48, identified as family friends, also faced five counts of rape. Glen Grose was convicted on three counts, and Johnny Grose was found guilty on two counts.

All three also were charged with five counts of touching a child for lustful purposes. They were convicted of one count. Additionally, all three were accused of child neglect and were convicted of that charge.

Jordan and Johnny Grose were sentenced to life in prison for rape and 10 years for each of the other two charges.

Glen Grose will be sentenced before Circuit Judge Andrew Howorth at a later date because he was determined to be a habitual offender.

During sentencing, at least six armed Lafayette County sheriff’s deputies were positioned throughout the courtroom to ensure no incidents occurred.

None of the defense attorneys would comment.

The jury deliberated more than two hours.

The trial, which started Sept. 29, was emotional and filled with graphic detail.

After the trial, Assistant District Attorney TR Trout said he was pleased with the verdict.

The girl’s mother, Krystal Jordan, was a prosecution key witness. She pleaded guilty to sexual battery in 2007.

During her testimony she said she initially allowed her husband to have sex with their daughter because she was pregnant.

According to Krystal Jordan, the 3-year-old cried so much the second time she was assaulted that she was given pain killers to prevent the noise.

The defense had attacked her testimony, saying she lied and took a deal with prosecutors in order to get a lesser sentence.

Krystal Jordan is serving a 10-year sentence in Lafayette County Detention Center.

“She couldn’t keep her testimony straight,” Timothy Jordan’s attorney Shane McLaughlin said. “These are the classic symptoms of a liar. … I don’t see how anyone could dispute that.”

During closing arguments, Trout acknowledged Krystal Jordan had lied, but not about the rape accusations.

“She’s a liar, and I don’t like saying that about my witness,” Trout said. “But everything she said has been corroborated by evidence.”

The three men were indicted in November 2005. The girl has been in the custody of her maternal grandmother.

The grandmother was the first to report the case to the Department of Human Services after the 3-year-old complained she had been injured. After the trial, the grandmother, with tears in her eyes, said, “I’m just glad it’s all over.”


Arthur Ankebrant – Repeat Sex Offender tries to kill probation officer


A 49-year-old convicted sex offender from West Bend who faces additional charges of trying to solicit an undercover officer to kill his probation agent and the father of the boy he molested was sent back to prison on Thursday for the original sex offense.

Under terms of the sentence imposed by Washington County Circuit Judge Patrick Faragher, Arthur Ankebrant will serve 10 years in prison followed by 15 years on extended supervision.

Ankebrant had been charged with child enticement and two counts of sexual assault of a child relating to a 2004 case.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Arthur Ankebrant – Repeat Sex Offender tries to kill probation officer


A 49-year-old convicted sex offender from West Bend who faces additional charges of trying to solicit an undercover officer to kill his probation agent and the father of the boy he molested was sent back to prison on Thursday for the original sex offense.

Under terms of the sentence imposed by Washington County Circuit Judge Patrick Faragher, Arthur Ankebrant will serve 10 years in prison followed by 15 years on extended supervision.

Ankebrant had been charged with child enticement and two counts of sexual assault of a child relating to a 2004 case.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

David T. Meyers – Repeat Sex Offender – killed by his targets father


Indianapolis police say a convicted sex offender died during a struggle after a father found the man in his 17-year-old daughter’s bedroom.

Marchele Hall of the Marion County coroner’s office says the cause of 52-year-old David T. Meyers’ death was ruled Monday to be asphyxia by strangulation with contributing cardiovascular disease.

County prosecutor’s office spokesman Matthew Symons says no charges are anticipated against 64-year-old Robert McNally, who locked his arm around Meyers’ neck and held him when he found him in his 17-year-old daughter’s bedroom early Sunday.

Police responding to a call from the city’s northwest side about 3:20 a.m. Sunday found McNally on the hallway floor with his arm around the neck of Meyers, who was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police say Meyers was naked except for a mask and latex gloves and had entered the home through a window with rope, condoms and a knife.

Police say the girl awoke and saw the man in her room and screamed.

Meyers had served 10 years in prison for criminal confinement and sexual deviate conduct and was wanted in Boone County for failure to register as a sex offender.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

David T. Meyers – Repeat Sex Offender – killed by his targets father


Indianapolis police say a convicted sex offender died during a struggle after a father found the man in his 17-year-old daughter’s bedroom.

Marchele Hall of the Marion County coroner’s office says the cause of 52-year-old David T. Meyers’ death was ruled Monday to be asphyxia by strangulation with contributing cardiovascular disease.

County prosecutor’s office spokesman Matthew Symons says no charges are anticipated against 64-year-old Robert McNally, who locked his arm around Meyers’ neck and held him when he found him in his 17-year-old daughter’s bedroom early Sunday.

Police responding to a call from the city’s northwest side about 3:20 a.m. Sunday found McNally on the hallway floor with his arm around the neck of Meyers, who was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police say Meyers was naked except for a mask and latex gloves and had entered the home through a window with rope, condoms and a knife.

Police say the girl awoke and saw the man in her room and screamed.

Meyers had served 10 years in prison for criminal confinement and sexual deviate conduct and was wanted in Boone County for failure to register as a sex offender.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Curtis Thompson – Repeat Sex Offender – Guilty Rapist

Thompson was convicted of four rapes in 1985 and
refused sex-offender treatment while in prison.

A sex predator who was freed by a jury rather than returned to prison in 2003 has been found guilty of assaulting two women at a University District apartment building less than a year later.

The victims said Curtis Thompson followed them into the building on Aug. 23, 2004, forced them into an elevator, robbed one of her engagement ring and forced the other to remove her top.

Thompson claimed the the confrontation with the two women in an elevator was “a misunderstanding” over his request for a cigarette. He has also claimed he was drunk when the incident occurred.

Thompson was charged with multiple counts of burglary, robbery, assault, attempted indecent liberties, unlawful imprisonment and attempting to disarm a police officer. He was found guilty on 10 of the counts and not guilty of one count of attempting to disarm a police officer.

Thompson faces life in prison because of his criminal history.

Throughout the three-week trial, Thompson was brought into the courtroom in a restraint chair because of his often-disruptive behavior. In the past, he has threatened to kill attorneys and a judge, and has scuffled with jail guards.

Thompson was convicted of four rapes in 1985 and refused sex-offender treatment while in prison.

In October 2003, after a three-week trial, a King County jury rejected a plea from prosecutors to send Thompson to a secure treatment center for sexual offenders. It was one of a handful of times since the process was created in 1990 that a sexually violent predator was released into the public instead of sent to the state’s Special Commitment Center after incarceration.

Less than a year later, Thompson was arrested after he allegedly committed a string of crimes, including the attack in the elevator. He faces 15 total charges in three separate cases that allegedly occurred within days.

Thompson is slated to return to court in November to face trial in the rape of an Eastlake woman on Aug. 17, 2004.

In January, he will be tried in the stabbing death of Deborah Byars, who was found dead in her North Seattle apartment Aug. 26, 2004.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte