Help pass Senate Bill 1738—The PROTECT Our Children Act

Did you know that an estimated 1 of 3 girls and 1 of 6 boys are sexually violated prior to the age 18?

Did you know that there are over 9,000 pedaphiles that make up a society which shares tips on how to molest children and hide it on the Internet?

Did you know the Internet allows pedophiles to have instant access to other predators worldwide, allows open discussions of their sexual desires, shares ideas about ways to lure victims, allows instant access to potential child victims worldwide and serves as an outlet for pedophiles to show live videos of raping children.

While pedophile Websites are being tracked down and removed from Internet servers in countries all over the world, they are still easily finding ways to post Websites, Webrings, forums and chat rooms.

While the number of pedophiles in the world continues to increase at an unbelieveable rate – the funds to capture these individuals are limited.

However, there is a bill which will be voted on Friday that could change the way law enforcement battles the problem of pedophiles in our society.

The Combating Child Exploitation Act of 2008 is coming to a vote in the Senate and everyone needs to make their senators know just how important this bill is and that they need to support the passing of Senate Bill 1738. This bill will change how many will react with the internet. This bill needs to be approved. Law enforcement agencies are heroically struggling against the surge of online criminal activities.

This bill will apply a stronger financial support for increased manpower and training. This will also cover laws enabled by emerging technology. This bill focuses on several points and issues. This bill will establish a special counsel for Child Exploitation prevention and interdiction within the office of the Deputy Attorney General. Also, the bill will strengthen and improve the internet crimes against children task force. Furthermore, the bill calls for an increase of resources for regional computer forensic labs to locate internet criminals.

Also, the bill will strengthen laws against child exploitation to increase the ability of law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute child sexual predators. The bill will also enable services to legally report child pornography violations directly to a foreign law enforcement agency to combat international criminals.

Millions across the nation look forward to the bill. Television personnel and celebrities urge view to support the bill.

The Protecting our Children Bill will authorize over $320 million over the next five years in greatly needed funding for law enforcement to investigate child exploitation. Also, it mandates that child rescue be a top priority for law enforcement receiving federal funding.

Published in: on September 24, 2008 at 11:37 pm  Leave a Comment  

Jason Harry Bishop – Repeat Sex Offender


A 42-year-old registered sex offender was arrested Tuesday when Monterey County sheriff’s deputies found child pornography at his Salinas home during a sex offender sweep, the sheriff’s office reported.

Jason Harry Bishop was arrested for possession of child pornography and for violating his parole for a previous conviction of annoying or molesting children, Detective Sgt. Archie Warren said.

He was arrested during a sweep by members of the sheriff’s Sexual Assault Felony Enforcement Team and California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation agents.

The sweep focused on registered sex offenders living in Salinas, Warren said. During such sweeps, if the offender is on parole, officers will often search the offender’s home to ensure he or she is complying with the parole terms.

Bishop will be arraigned later this week in Monterey County.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Jason Harry Bishop – Repeat Sex Offender


A 42-year-old registered sex offender was arrested Tuesday when Monterey County sheriff’s deputies found child pornography at his Salinas home during a sex offender sweep, the sheriff’s office reported.

Jason Harry Bishop was arrested for possession of child pornography and for violating his parole for a previous conviction of annoying or molesting children, Detective Sgt. Archie Warren said.

He was arrested during a sweep by members of the sheriff’s Sexual Assault Felony Enforcement Team and California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation agents.

The sweep focused on registered sex offenders living in Salinas, Warren said. During such sweeps, if the offender is on parole, officers will often search the offender’s home to ensure he or she is complying with the parole terms.

Bishop will be arraigned later this week in Monterey County.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Appeals court upholds sex offender ban

Plainfield has won the latest round in the long-running lawsuit filed by a convicted sex offender who was banned from the town’s parks.

The Indiana Court of Appeals today released a 20-page ruling that upholds the town’s 2002 ordinance prohibiting persons on the state registry of sex offenders from going into Plainfield parks and recreation facilities.

While the ban on sex offenders in the parks does have a punitive aspect, the court said it is not unconstitutional, as the plaintiff, identified only as John Doe, tried to claim in his suit.

The appeals court said Plainfield did not violate the portion of the Indiana Constitution that guarantees rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness to everyone.

Plainfield Town Manager Rich Carlucci said today that the purpose of the ban on registered sex offenders in the parks is to keep them away from children playing in the park.

The appeals court decision upholds a ruling in March this year by Hendricks Superior Court Judge Robert W. Freese, who had granted summary judgment for Plainfield and upheld the town’s ordinance.

Doe, a Marion County resident, was represented by the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana in filing the suit challenging Plainfield’s ban on sex offenders in the parks.

According to the Court of Appeals, Doe was a convicted sex offender. He also has acquired joint legal custody of his minor son, according to the court.

Doe and his son visited Plainfield parks and recreation areas in 2004 and 2005, according to the court.

In June 2005, a Plainfield policeman recognized Doe in the Recreation Center and Splash Island. He told Doe of the town ordinance banning anyone on the state’s online registry of convicted sex offenders from being in the parks.

Doe sued Plainfield in November 2005, which began nearly three years of twists and turns in the legal case.

In one key step, Doe won a controversial court ruling to keep his identity secret in the legal proceeding even though he is listed publicly on the state registry of sex offenders.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Safe Harbor for Prostituted Children

There are no child prostitutes.

There are only prostituted children.

Children who are pressed, prodded and pummeled into selling sex, should be treated like victims — which is what they are — not like criminals. That’s the paradigm shift that a bill awaiting action on Gov. David Paterson’s desk would mandate. Paterson should sign it.

The “Safe Harbor” legislation would change the current practice of routinely arresting, prosecuting and jailing children — those under the age of 18 — for prostitution. Authorities would be required instead to provide them with state supervision and services such as shelter, crisis intervention and help toward a better life.

That would cost some money, which may be the rub. The state would need to provide safe houses and also some longer-term housing options to provide a way out of the sex trade for teens whose family situations make going home impossible. That should be done as cost-effectively as possibile — for instance by adapting current facilities to this new use — but it has to be done.

Children can’t legally consent to sex. That’s recognized when they’re trafficked across national borders and forced into sexual slavery. And it’s recognized when they’re abused by pedophiles. It should be no different when the child is American, the predator is a pimp and the pedophile is a “John.”

Edgardo Sensi – Charged with child porn – and more

an investigation is still open as to possible sexual battery charges against Sensi, who in one video was shown having sex with a girl under 12 and in another with a girl under 5.

Prosecutors have added more charges against the man accused of having hundreds of images and videos of child pornography, including videos of himself having sex with children.

Edgardo Sensi, 52, of Jensen Beach was arrested Sept. 10 on 10 felony counts of possession of child pornography after detectives investigating online child pornography distribution raided his home.

Sensi was charged with 31 more counts while he was at the Martin County jail Tuesday, bringing his bail to around $2.5 million, Assistant State Attorney Erin Kirkwood said.

Kirkwood said an investigation is still open as to possible sexual battery charges against Sensi, who in one video was shown having sex with a girl under 12 and in another with a girl under 5.

Detectives are still trying to determine where those tapes were filmed.

Since 2005, Sensi was the vice president of operations for Stuart-based tour operator Big Five Tours and Expeditions, which offers sojourns to exotic destinations such as Africa and Asia. He was fired when the company learned about the allegations against him, company president Ashish Sanghrajka said.

Sanghrajka said that Sensi went on business trips abroad.

Sanghrajka said he didn’t know much about Sensi, except that he had a 15-year-old son who lives in Palm Beach County and that Sensi was Catholic and sang opera at his church.

Edgardo Sensi – Charged with child porn – and more

an investigation is still open as to possible sexual battery charges against Sensi, who in one video was shown having sex with a girl under 12 and in another with a girl under 5.

Prosecutors have added more charges against the man accused of having hundreds of images and videos of child pornography, including videos of himself having sex with children.

Edgardo Sensi, 52, of Jensen Beach was arrested Sept. 10 on 10 felony counts of possession of child pornography after detectives investigating online child pornography distribution raided his home.

Sensi was charged with 31 more counts while he was at the Martin County jail Tuesday, bringing his bail to around $2.5 million, Assistant State Attorney Erin Kirkwood said.

Kirkwood said an investigation is still open as to possible sexual battery charges against Sensi, who in one video was shown having sex with a girl under 12 and in another with a girl under 5.

Detectives are still trying to determine where those tapes were filmed.

Since 2005, Sensi was the vice president of operations for Stuart-based tour operator Big Five Tours and Expeditions, which offers sojourns to exotic destinations such as Africa and Asia. He was fired when the company learned about the allegations against him, company president Ashish Sanghrajka said.

Sanghrajka said that Sensi went on business trips abroad.

Sanghrajka said he didn’t know much about Sensi, except that he had a 15-year-old son who lives in Palm Beach County and that Sensi was Catholic and sang opera at his church.

James Scott Rogers – 200th internet predator – "niceguy4u810"

Attorney General Mike Cox today announced that his office has reached a new benchmark and arrested 200 Internet predators since 2003. Upon taking office, Cox restructured the criminal division and made child protection a priority of his administration.

“Every day, child predators troll the Internet seeking to exploit our children,” said Cox. “Today””s record breaking achievement is a reminder that my office and law enforcement across the state continues to track down child predators in order to remove them before they can hurt a child.”

Cox reached the 200th mark with the arrest of James Scott Rogers, 44, of Linden. Rogers is charged with using the Internet to commit child sexual abusive activity.

On August 25, Rogers was arrested after attempting to meet with who he thought was the minor he communicated with on the Internet. Rogers was communicating with an undercover volunteer from the citizens”” group Perverted Justice posing as a 14-year old girl. Rogers was also charged with 2 felonies for sending sexually explicit photos to the person he believed was a 14-year old girl.

Rogers was arraigned on August 26, 2008, at 34th District Court in Romulus, before Judge Tina Brooks Green. He is charged with:

One count of child sexually abusive activity, a 20 year felony;

One count of using the Internet to communicate with another to commit child sexually abusive activity, a 20 year felony;

One count of using the Internet to disseminate sexually explicit matter to a minor, a 4 year felony; and,

One count of using the Internet to distribute child sexually abusive material to a minor, a 10 year felony.

Judge Green set Rogers”” bond at $50,000 cash, the defendant is scheduled to be back in court on October 1, 2008. Upon examination of Rogers”” computer, child pornography was discovered; more charges are possible, pending further investigation.

Because of the seriousness of the problem of Internet predators, Cox created an education curriculum that his Department teaches in schools throughout Michigan called the Child Safety Initiative (Michigan CSI). The initiative is broken into four classes, targeting grades, K-1, 2-3, 4-6, and a community seminar aimed at educating teachers, parents and community leaders. The program has received national praise and reached more than 214,000 students in the 2007-08 school year, and began its second season last week.

For more information on how to protect your child from Internet predators visit www.michigan.gov/csi.

Parents are encouraged to check their children””s “buddy lists” for the screen name Rogers used including “niceguy4u810.” If they believe their child had contact with Rogers, parents should contact the Attorney General””s office at (313) 456-0180.

A criminal charge is merely an accusation, and the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

By the Office of the Michigan Attorney General

William Goad and his Legacy of Torment – The pedophile with thousands of victims

As the fourth anniversary of the jailing of sex beast William Goad approaches, Crime Reporter Carl Eve speaks to Sgt John Livingstone, one of the officers who brought him to justice, and discovers the list of his victims continues to grow

THE figures which lie behind predatory paedophile William Goad’s crimes are as immeasurable as the damage he has done to two, perhaps even three, generations of Plymouth people.

A great many of his victims have found solace in the bottle or the needle, or in extremes of violence to others and themselves. Some have taken their own lives, no longer capable of living in emotional and psychological agony. Their parents, brothers, sisters, partners and children have also become part of that suffering.

Goad is now 64. Jailed on October 4, 2004 he is just four years into serving a discretionary life sentence – although he still has the promise of a six-year, two month minimum tariff if he can show the authorities he is no longer a danger to the public.

Yet Goad’s perverse nature has undoubtedly created splinters which have worked their way deep into Plymouth’s skin.

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Sgt John Livingstone, who was part of the team who brought Goad to justice, was a Detective Constable at the time.

Gathering evidence against Goad, tracking down numerous victims, he still believes Goad’s boasts of attempting to beat his own record of abusing 142 boys in one year was no exaggeration.

He said there was a 35-year period between the dates the oldest and youngest victims mentioned in interview.

“We had victims from four decades. We worked out there to be thousands if he was as prolific as he boasted to be,” he said.

“Some only came forward because they were approached by us.”

Some of those interviewed by police never admitted to being victims, even though officers had sworn testimony by others who witnessed the horrific rapes.

Sgt Livingstone said: “They had put it behind them and didn’t want it brought up. The chances are they may take it to their doctor or a counsellor – more report it to them than to us.”

This was recently confirmed by staff at support group Twelve’s Company, which told The Herald they have received around one Goad-related referral a week since he was jailed.

Sgt Livingstone said: “Because it’s such a dirty little secret they don’t want it to be known, and Goad relied on that. He was quite successful in getting them to think it was their fault and their dirty little secret.”

Sgt Livingstone, who now works in Kingsbridge, is still regularly called by barristers and solicitors working for victims of Goad who are struggling with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority.

The authority invariably argues a victim’s own criminality bars them from compensation for their suffering. Sgt Livingstone argues the abuse they suffered preceded any criminality – and often helped create it.

Many of those sought out by investigators blamed themselves, beating themselves up over why they returned again and again to be abused. Some were trapped by fear, others were won over by presents and friendship which, though at odds with the violent and sexual abuse, meant they would often prefer it to difficulties at home.

But as many mothers pointed out to police, this turned their vulnerable sons into some of the city’s most problematic criminals.

Sgt Livingstone said: “They’re all over the country. We visited them in prisons, for horrendous crimes, violent crimes. They are very hard men in hard prisons.

“One guy came into the room as the top dog of the prison. He had this big pony tail. He thought we were there to speak about some offence.

“I happened to mention Goad and he physically shrank. Shirley [Det Con Shirley Thompson who worked alongside Sgt Livingstone] and I were amazed at the reaction. From a confident hard man to almost a little boy. He refused to go public.

“I saw him afterwards in a confrontational situation – he would just give me a smile.

“For the court case all of those we dealt with had criminal records, drug-related, alcohol-related, violence. It all seemed to be a product of the abuse.

“But when you spoke to them, got to know them, they were nice people. You forget their appearance, their record. They were very decent people.

“Goad created the persona of being well connected, a gangster.

“He told the boys he could have them got rid of, that he could get people to hurt their families.

“The majority of the people who went to court believed him even as he was in the dock. It took a lot of guts and determination to go to court when a lot of them still believed that he could get to them.”

Sgt Livingstone admitted there were previous investigations into Goad.

He said: “They didn’t go anywhere. Why that is I can’t say.

“There were rumours he was very well connected with authority types.”

Goad’s other safeguard was to choose his victims carefully.

Sgt Livingstone said: “He made sure they came from vulnerable backgrounds. Some were in children’s homes, yet he had access to the homes as an ‘uncle’.”

Goad tore his way through vulnerable, emotionally-starved young boys. One, who lived in abject poverty, admitted to police he cried the first time Goad hugged him as he had never been shown such kindness before.

Others marvelled at the open house policy which saw teams of youths hang out, drinking pop, eating snacks, playing table football or pool at Roville, one of Goad’s homes.

A self-made millionaire, Goad created an empire which was an alluring trap for his victims.

Selling items at knockdown prices, he would happily help out struggling single mums, even offering jobs to their young sons.

He created the Mount Gould Camping Club, which he ran himself, encouraging young boys to join.

As a former director of Cornish Market World, which still houses Ben’s Playworld, one of the largest indoor children’s play parks in the South West, staff noted he would happily sit and watch the children play for hours at a time. He owned two houses in Plymouth – in Tavistock Road and Ford Park Road – both overlooking school playing fields.

But for all his charm and initial kindness shown, it was never about consideration or caring for the boys.

As Sgt Livingstone notes, for abusers like Goad it was not about sex, it was about control.

“He had boys try and abduct others. One failed, saying he couldn’t do it and so he was raped and abused more violently than normally,” he said.

Operation Emotion, which targeted Goad, turned into Operation Faber to tackle other offenders mentioned during the Goad inquiry.

Sgt Livingstone said: “It opened my eyes about how much abuse there was. A lot of the people that we investigated were from the same generation as Goad, or older.

“There was not so much reporting or awareness to report things back then.

“[We found] some kids were told by police that they were ‘lying little queers’. Imagine getting up the courage to tell the police about being abused and being told you’re not believed?

“I heard stories about boys being held down, of parties of men turning up, paedophile rings. Some [of the men] were older, older than Goad. They would’ve been in charge at the time. He learned from them, learned tactics and contacts.

“Groups of them used to frequent down by what is now Toys R Us, it used to be a market area then. There was loads of movement and action there. Boys would go and meet people in cars.

“This would’ve been the 1950s and 1960s, boys going to town to meet men in cars and do things.

“These people are never going to come forward.”

So when will the nightmare created by Goad come to an end?

Sgt Livingstone believes there are decades more hurt to be dealt with.

He said: “We saw victims over four decades. You could easily be talking about another 30 years before the last ones disclose – some may never tell or disclose. Some could deal with it. Some could commit suicide, some already have.

“One told his mother he had been abused by Goad when he was 13. In his 20s he poured petrol over himself and set it alight.

“A few over the years have committed suicide, some through drugs, some through alcohol.

“It’s going to be an ongoing problem, not just coming forward, but just the other things they do.

“How many others are not dealing with it? How many of our targeted criminals are a reaction from Goad or the others?

“We may never know how many because they may never come forward.

“The people who will notice or have indications are the non-police organisations, the doctors, groups like Twelve’s Company.

“They will see them turn up at court, see the court reports in the paper, or see them in the obituary column.”

You can reach Twelve’s Company by calling 01752 220400 or visit their website www.twelvescompany.co.uk.

William Goad and his Legacy of Torment – The pedophile with thousands of victims

As the fourth anniversary of the jailing of sex beast William Goad approaches, Crime Reporter Carl Eve speaks to Sgt John Livingstone, one of the officers who brought him to justice, and discovers the list of his victims continues to grow

THE figures which lie behind predatory paedophile William Goad’s crimes are as immeasurable as the damage he has done to two, perhaps even three, generations of Plymouth people.

A great many of his victims have found solace in the bottle or the needle, or in extremes of violence to others and themselves. Some have taken their own lives, no longer capable of living in emotional and psychological agony. Their parents, brothers, sisters, partners and children have also become part of that suffering.

Goad is now 64. Jailed on October 4, 2004 he is just four years into serving a discretionary life sentence – although he still has the promise of a six-year, two month minimum tariff if he can show the authorities he is no longer a danger to the public.

Yet Goad’s perverse nature has undoubtedly created splinters which have worked their way deep into Plymouth’s skin.

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Sgt John Livingstone, who was part of the team who brought Goad to justice, was a Detective Constable at the time.

Gathering evidence against Goad, tracking down numerous victims, he still believes Goad’s boasts of attempting to beat his own record of abusing 142 boys in one year was no exaggeration.

He said there was a 35-year period between the dates the oldest and youngest victims mentioned in interview.

“We had victims from four decades. We worked out there to be thousands if he was as prolific as he boasted to be,” he said.

“Some only came forward because they were approached by us.”

Some of those interviewed by police never admitted to being victims, even though officers had sworn testimony by others who witnessed the horrific rapes.

Sgt Livingstone said: “They had put it behind them and didn’t want it brought up. The chances are they may take it to their doctor or a counsellor – more report it to them than to us.”

This was recently confirmed by staff at support group Twelve’s Company, which told The Herald they have received around one Goad-related referral a week since he was jailed.

Sgt Livingstone said: “Because it’s such a dirty little secret they don’t want it to be known, and Goad relied on that. He was quite successful in getting them to think it was their fault and their dirty little secret.”

Sgt Livingstone, who now works in Kingsbridge, is still regularly called by barristers and solicitors working for victims of Goad who are struggling with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority.

The authority invariably argues a victim’s own criminality bars them from compensation for their suffering. Sgt Livingstone argues the abuse they suffered preceded any criminality – and often helped create it.

Many of those sought out by investigators blamed themselves, beating themselves up over why they returned again and again to be abused. Some were trapped by fear, others were won over by presents and friendship which, though at odds with the violent and sexual abuse, meant they would often prefer it to difficulties at home.

But as many mothers pointed out to police, this turned their vulnerable sons into some of the city’s most problematic criminals.

Sgt Livingstone said: “They’re all over the country. We visited them in prisons, for horrendous crimes, violent crimes. They are very hard men in hard prisons.

“One guy came into the room as the top dog of the prison. He had this big pony tail. He thought we were there to speak about some offence.

“I happened to mention Goad and he physically shrank. Shirley [Det Con Shirley Thompson who worked alongside Sgt Livingstone] and I were amazed at the reaction. From a confident hard man to almost a little boy. He refused to go public.

“I saw him afterwards in a confrontational situation – he would just give me a smile.

“For the court case all of those we dealt with had criminal records, drug-related, alcohol-related, violence. It all seemed to be a product of the abuse.

“But when you spoke to them, got to know them, they were nice people. You forget their appearance, their record. They were very decent people.

“Goad created the persona of being well connected, a gangster.

“He told the boys he could have them got rid of, that he could get people to hurt their families.

“The majority of the people who went to court believed him even as he was in the dock. It took a lot of guts and determination to go to court when a lot of them still believed that he could get to them.”

Sgt Livingstone admitted there were previous investigations into Goad.

He said: “They didn’t go anywhere. Why that is I can’t say.

“There were rumours he was very well connected with authority types.”

Goad’s other safeguard was to choose his victims carefully.

Sgt Livingstone said: “He made sure they came from vulnerable backgrounds. Some were in children’s homes, yet he had access to the homes as an ‘uncle’.”

Goad tore his way through vulnerable, emotionally-starved young boys. One, who lived in abject poverty, admitted to police he cried the first time Goad hugged him as he had never been shown such kindness before.

Others marvelled at the open house policy which saw teams of youths hang out, drinking pop, eating snacks, playing table football or pool at Roville, one of Goad’s homes.

A self-made millionaire, Goad created an empire which was an alluring trap for his victims.

Selling items at knockdown prices, he would happily help out struggling single mums, even offering jobs to their young sons.

He created the Mount Gould Camping Club, which he ran himself, encouraging young boys to join.

As a former director of Cornish Market World, which still houses Ben’s Playworld, one of the largest indoor children’s play parks in the South West, staff noted he would happily sit and watch the children play for hours at a time. He owned two houses in Plymouth – in Tavistock Road and Ford Park Road – both overlooking school playing fields.

But for all his charm and initial kindness shown, it was never about consideration or caring for the boys.

As Sgt Livingstone notes, for abusers like Goad it was not about sex, it was about control.

“He had boys try and abduct others. One failed, saying he couldn’t do it and so he was raped and abused more violently than normally,” he said.

Operation Emotion, which targeted Goad, turned into Operation Faber to tackle other offenders mentioned during the Goad inquiry.

Sgt Livingstone said: “It opened my eyes about how much abuse there was. A lot of the people that we investigated were from the same generation as Goad, or older.

“There was not so much reporting or awareness to report things back then.

“[We found] some kids were told by police that they were ‘lying little queers’. Imagine getting up the courage to tell the police about being abused and being told you’re not believed?

“I heard stories about boys being held down, of parties of men turning up, paedophile rings. Some [of the men] were older, older than Goad. They would’ve been in charge at the time. He learned from them, learned tactics and contacts.

“Groups of them used to frequent down by what is now Toys R Us, it used to be a market area then. There was loads of movement and action there. Boys would go and meet people in cars.

“This would’ve been the 1950s and 1960s, boys going to town to meet men in cars and do things.

“These people are never going to come forward.”

So when will the nightmare created by Goad come to an end?

Sgt Livingstone believes there are decades more hurt to be dealt with.

He said: “We saw victims over four decades. You could easily be talking about another 30 years before the last ones disclose – some may never tell or disclose. Some could deal with it. Some could commit suicide, some already have.

“One told his mother he had been abused by Goad when he was 13. In his 20s he poured petrol over himself and set it alight.

“A few over the years have committed suicide, some through drugs, some through alcohol.

“It’s going to be an ongoing problem, not just coming forward, but just the other things they do.

“How many others are not dealing with it? How many of our targeted criminals are a reaction from Goad or the others?

“We may never know how many because they may never come forward.

“The people who will notice or have indications are the non-police organisations, the doctors, groups like Twelve’s Company.

“They will see them turn up at court, see the court reports in the paper, or see them in the obituary column.”

You can reach Twelve’s Company by calling 01752 220400 or visit their website www.twelvescompany.co.uk.