Gary Glitter – Unremorseful Paedophile – Returns to a world that no longer wants him

Glitter, like many child sexual abusers, has failed to demonstrate remorse for the sexual offences he has been convicted of, and as such he remains at a “high risk” of reoffending. The implication is that if he is not sorry for what he has done, he is more likely to do it again. This is why there is a need for systems and laws that can monitor the whereabouts of convicted sex offenders and restrict their access to children.

What we thought we knew hid a monster within.
He is every parent’s worst nightmare:
a strange and odd man

who has victimised children around the world.
But we didn’t know then, and couldn’t tell.
And it is this that makes us feel vulnerable.

The former star has three days to give police a permanent address – but they are believed to be aware of his current whereabouts.

Neither Glitter nor his solicitor would say where the 64-year-old convicted paedophile plans to live now he is reluctantly back in the UK.

He arrived home yesterday after a four-day tour of Asia, apparently trying to avoid returning to Britain.

Glitter had just been released from a Vietnamese prison after serving two years and nine months of a three year sentence for sex crimes involving two girls aged 10 and 11

He flew to Bangkok where he was due to board a flight to London, but he refused, saying he felt ill.

However, the Thai authorities would not allow him through passport control and he was eventually forced to fly on to Hong Kong.

Chinese authorities also refused him entry and he flew back to Bangkok, where Thai police and immigration officials insisted he return to Britain.

He arrived at Heathrow’s Terminal 3, where he remained while his solicitor David Corker went to court on his behalf.

Mr Corker appeared at Uxbridge Magistrates Court, west London, where he was told that Glitter, whose real name is Paul Gadd, had three days in which to sign the sex offenders register.

Scotland Yard had successfully applied for an order requiring Gadd to register as a sex offender – although he has 21 days to appeal.

Once on the register, Glitter must inform police if he plans to travel abroad for more than three days – and breaching the rules can result in a prison sentence of up to five years.

That he generates such strong emotions is both a function of his familiarity to us and, paradoxically, his distance from us. As suggested, his familiarity reminds the public that abusers are often popular, trusted and liked: indistinguishable from other ordinary men (and women) in our lives. This is terrifying, and this is why the public prefers to think that abusers are extraordinary – like a glam rocker: flamboyant, excessive, bizarre and uncommon. But being bizarre did not lead to Glitter’s downfall (his collection of child porn was uncovered by chance by a computer repair man at PC World) and child sexual abuse is far from uncommon.

He was over the top, but not scary, not threatening. He’d been around for so long that we thought we knew him, we thought we were in on the joke. People had taken his songs into their homes and Gary Glitter into their hearts. So, when his crimes became public knowledge, his betrayal felt personal. His excess, once endearing, was now sinister. What we thought we knew hid a monster within. He is every parent’s worst nightmare: a strange and odd man who has victimised children around the world. But we didn’t know then, and couldn’t tell. And it is this that makes us feel vulnerable.

He is the bogeyman for our times because child sexual abuse is one of the public’s biggest fears. As the visible face of a largely hidden population, Glitter represents a target for all the anger and hurt that he and other (hidden) child sexual abusers invoke.

Gary Glitter – Unremorseful Paedophile – Returns to a world that no longer wants him

Glitter, like many child sexual abusers, has failed to demonstrate remorse for the sexual offences he has been convicted of, and as such he remains at a “high risk” of reoffending. The implication is that if he is not sorry for what he has done, he is more likely to do it again. This is why there is a need for systems and laws that can monitor the whereabouts of convicted sex offenders and restrict their access to children.

What we thought we knew hid a monster within.
He is every parent’s worst nightmare:
a strange and odd man

who has victimised children around the world.
But we didn’t know then, and couldn’t tell.
And it is this that makes us feel vulnerable.

The former star has three days to give police a permanent address – but they are believed to be aware of his current whereabouts.

Neither Glitter nor his solicitor would say where the 64-year-old convicted paedophile plans to live now he is reluctantly back in the UK.

He arrived home yesterday after a four-day tour of Asia, apparently trying to avoid returning to Britain.

Glitter had just been released from a Vietnamese prison after serving two years and nine months of a three year sentence for sex crimes involving two girls aged 10 and 11

He flew to Bangkok where he was due to board a flight to London, but he refused, saying he felt ill.

However, the Thai authorities would not allow him through passport control and he was eventually forced to fly on to Hong Kong.

Chinese authorities also refused him entry and he flew back to Bangkok, where Thai police and immigration officials insisted he return to Britain.

He arrived at Heathrow’s Terminal 3, where he remained while his solicitor David Corker went to court on his behalf.

Mr Corker appeared at Uxbridge Magistrates Court, west London, where he was told that Glitter, whose real name is Paul Gadd, had three days in which to sign the sex offenders register.

Scotland Yard had successfully applied for an order requiring Gadd to register as a sex offender – although he has 21 days to appeal.

Once on the register, Glitter must inform police if he plans to travel abroad for more than three days – and breaching the rules can result in a prison sentence of up to five years.

That he generates such strong emotions is both a function of his familiarity to us and, paradoxically, his distance from us. As suggested, his familiarity reminds the public that abusers are often popular, trusted and liked: indistinguishable from other ordinary men (and women) in our lives. This is terrifying, and this is why the public prefers to think that abusers are extraordinary – like a glam rocker: flamboyant, excessive, bizarre and uncommon. But being bizarre did not lead to Glitter’s downfall (his collection of child porn was uncovered by chance by a computer repair man at PC World) and child sexual abuse is far from uncommon.

He was over the top, but not scary, not threatening. He’d been around for so long that we thought we knew him, we thought we were in on the joke. People had taken his songs into their homes and Gary Glitter into their hearts. So, when his crimes became public knowledge, his betrayal felt personal. His excess, once endearing, was now sinister. What we thought we knew hid a monster within. He is every parent’s worst nightmare: a strange and odd man who has victimised children around the world. But we didn’t know then, and couldn’t tell. And it is this that makes us feel vulnerable.

He is the bogeyman for our times because child sexual abuse is one of the public’s biggest fears. As the visible face of a largely hidden population, Glitter represents a target for all the anger and hurt that he and other (hidden) child sexual abusers invoke.

Shawn Harper – Repeat Sex Offender – Serial Child Molester – Treatment didn’t work

In 1992, he was convicted of two counts of molesting little boys in Burlington. Under a plea deal he spent just 4 months in prison and got a satisfactory release from probation in 2000 after he completed sex offender treatment.


Shawn Harper, 33, was back in the Burlington court Monday accused of sexual assaults on a young boy.

“We’re very, very concerned that if he’s allowed back on the streets. He’s gone under the radar for three years and he’s back in Vermont less than a month,” Chittenden Deputy Prosecutor Susan Hardin said.

Harper is no stranger to the courts and charges of molesting kids.

In 1992, he was convicted of two counts of molesting little boys in Burlington.

Under a plea deal he spent just 4 months in prison and got a satisfactory release from probation in 2000 after he completed sex offender treatment.

Under law, he was a registered sex offender required to update his address annually or within three days of moving.

But in 2005 he moved to New York and disappeared– until last week. That’s when Vermont police learned he moved back to Burlington a month ago and allegedly sexually assaulted a 7-year-old boy while visiting family on Park Street two years ago.

Police also learned that Harper is the target of child sex abuse investigations in Utah and Arizona.

The judge wondered why no one had been looking for him for failing to register as a sex offender for at least two years.

“Regardless of whether they’re here or not here you might look and say oh, he hasn’t registered for two years,” Judge Linda Levitt said.

“I agree and luckily we’re having more sweeps and locating more people that are not registering,” Hardin said.

“He went missing for lack of a better term where no one from at least the registry or state law enforcement here knew where he was residing,” said Detective Tyler Kinney, of the Chittenden Unit for Special Investigations.

Kinney says this case underscores a major problem with the sex offender registry– authorities are not required to check on the offender addresses to see if they actually live where they claim. So he started a sweep system last year for Chittenden County.

“Today we netted about 65 arrests and or warrants applied for. In some instances, I know some of those people have gone to other states,” Kinney said.

Harper pled innocent to the two sex assault charges. He is being held without bail pending a hearing next week.

Police agencies in at least four other Vermont communities are planning sweeps to ensure sex offenders are residing where they are supposed to. But when registered sex offenders move to other states those other states are supposed to keep track of them. And it doesn’t work very well– for example, California has about 120,000 registered offenders and 30,000 have completely disappeared.

It appears that all an offender has to do is move to another state to escape scrutiny. It’s because every state has different registry laws and there is no uniform method for states to share information and track offenders across state lines. But that is supposed to change next year when a new federal law goes into effect. Not only will state registries be integrated — but more information will be available directly to the public.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Shawn Harper – Repeat Sex Offender – Serial Child Molester – Treatment didn’t work

In 1992, he was convicted of two counts of molesting little boys in Burlington. Under a plea deal he spent just 4 months in prison and got a satisfactory release from probation in 2000 after he completed sex offender treatment.


Shawn Harper, 33, was back in the Burlington court Monday accused of sexual assaults on a young boy.

“We’re very, very concerned that if he’s allowed back on the streets. He’s gone under the radar for three years and he’s back in Vermont less than a month,” Chittenden Deputy Prosecutor Susan Hardin said.

Harper is no stranger to the courts and charges of molesting kids.

In 1992, he was convicted of two counts of molesting little boys in Burlington.

Under a plea deal he spent just 4 months in prison and got a satisfactory release from probation in 2000 after he completed sex offender treatment.

Under law, he was a registered sex offender required to update his address annually or within three days of moving.

But in 2005 he moved to New York and disappeared– until last week. That’s when Vermont police learned he moved back to Burlington a month ago and allegedly sexually assaulted a 7-year-old boy while visiting family on Park Street two years ago.

Police also learned that Harper is the target of child sex abuse investigations in Utah and Arizona.

The judge wondered why no one had been looking for him for failing to register as a sex offender for at least two years.

“Regardless of whether they’re here or not here you might look and say oh, he hasn’t registered for two years,” Judge Linda Levitt said.

“I agree and luckily we’re having more sweeps and locating more people that are not registering,” Hardin said.

“He went missing for lack of a better term where no one from at least the registry or state law enforcement here knew where he was residing,” said Detective Tyler Kinney, of the Chittenden Unit for Special Investigations.

Kinney says this case underscores a major problem with the sex offender registry– authorities are not required to check on the offender addresses to see if they actually live where they claim. So he started a sweep system last year for Chittenden County.

“Today we netted about 65 arrests and or warrants applied for. In some instances, I know some of those people have gone to other states,” Kinney said.

Harper pled innocent to the two sex assault charges. He is being held without bail pending a hearing next week.

Police agencies in at least four other Vermont communities are planning sweeps to ensure sex offenders are residing where they are supposed to. But when registered sex offenders move to other states those other states are supposed to keep track of them. And it doesn’t work very well– for example, California has about 120,000 registered offenders and 30,000 have completely disappeared.

It appears that all an offender has to do is move to another state to escape scrutiny. It’s because every state has different registry laws and there is no uniform method for states to share information and track offenders across state lines. But that is supposed to change next year when a new federal law goes into effect. Not only will state registries be integrated — but more information will be available directly to the public.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Shawn Harper – Repeat Sex Offender – Serial Child Molester – Treatment didn’t work

In 1992, he was convicted of two counts of molesting little boys in Burlington. Under a plea deal he spent just 4 months in prison and got a satisfactory release from probation in 2000 after he completed sex offender treatment.


Shawn Harper, 33, was back in the Burlington court Monday accused of sexual assaults on a young boy.

“We’re very, very concerned that if he’s allowed back on the streets. He’s gone under the radar for three years and he’s back in Vermont less than a month,” Chittenden Deputy Prosecutor Susan Hardin said.

Harper is no stranger to the courts and charges of molesting kids.

In 1992, he was convicted of two counts of molesting little boys in Burlington.

Under a plea deal he spent just 4 months in prison and got a satisfactory release from probation in 2000 after he completed sex offender treatment.

Under law, he was a registered sex offender required to update his address annually or within three days of moving.

But in 2005 he moved to New York and disappeared– until last week. That’s when Vermont police learned he moved back to Burlington a month ago and allegedly sexually assaulted a 7-year-old boy while visiting family on Park Street two years ago.

Police also learned that Harper is the target of child sex abuse investigations in Utah and Arizona.

The judge wondered why no one had been looking for him for failing to register as a sex offender for at least two years.

“Regardless of whether they’re here or not here you might look and say oh, he hasn’t registered for two years,” Judge Linda Levitt said.

“I agree and luckily we’re having more sweeps and locating more people that are not registering,” Hardin said.

“He went missing for lack of a better term where no one from at least the registry or state law enforcement here knew where he was residing,” said Detective Tyler Kinney, of the Chittenden Unit for Special Investigations.

Kinney says this case underscores a major problem with the sex offender registry– authorities are not required to check on the offender addresses to see if they actually live where they claim. So he started a sweep system last year for Chittenden County.

“Today we netted about 65 arrests and or warrants applied for. In some instances, I know some of those people have gone to other states,” Kinney said.

Harper pled innocent to the two sex assault charges. He is being held without bail pending a hearing next week.

Police agencies in at least four other Vermont communities are planning sweeps to ensure sex offenders are residing where they are supposed to. But when registered sex offenders move to other states those other states are supposed to keep track of them. And it doesn’t work very well– for example, California has about 120,000 registered offenders and 30,000 have completely disappeared.

It appears that all an offender has to do is move to another state to escape scrutiny. It’s because every state has different registry laws and there is no uniform method for states to share information and track offenders across state lines. But that is supposed to change next year when a new federal law goes into effect. Not only will state registries be integrated — but more information will be available directly to the public.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte