Clint A. Nevitt – Repeat Sex Offender Paid a mother to have sex with child

He allegedly paid the 11-year-old’s mother to have sex with the girl, said Middletown police Detective Fred Shuemake, who called Nevitt “one of the worst” pedophiles he’s seen in his 10 years as a juvenile detective.


A registered sex offender already accused of gross sexual imposition with a 9-year-old Middletown girl is now facing charges he raped an 11-year-old, according to the Butler County Prosecutor’s Office.

Clint A. Nevitt, 32, of Middletown, was indicted by a Butler County grand jury on three counts of rape and two counts of gross sexual imposition.

He allegedly paid the 11-year-old’s mother to have sex with the girl, said Middletown police Detective Fred Shuemake, who called Nevitt “one of the worst” pedophiles he’s seen in his 10 years as a juvenile detective.

The allegations came to light after the 11-year-old, who is now living with her father outside of Middletown, told a therapist about the encounters. The girl said her mother, who has not been charged with any crimes, used the money to buy drugs, Shuemake said.

In 2001, Nevitt was accused of raping a third girl, who was 12 at the time and is related to his 9-year-old accuser.

He served two years in prison and was listed in the state’s sex offender registry after he pleaded guilty to gross sexual imposition and attempted rape.

The 9-year-old girl testified in a June preliminary hearing that Nevitt paid her to touch him.

Her grandmother testified Nevitt contacted her before the allegations involving her granddaughter and asked for her help in finding him “young stuff.”

He allegedly had more success when he repeated the same request to the mother of the
11-year-old, Shuemake said.

Nevitt is being held in the Butler County Jail in lieu of a $100,000 bond. He faces up to 40 years in prison if convicted on all counts.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Clint A. Nevitt – Repeat Sex Offender Paid a mother to have sex with child

He allegedly paid the 11-year-old’s mother to have sex with the girl, said Middletown police Detective Fred Shuemake, who called Nevitt “one of the worst” pedophiles he’s seen in his 10 years as a juvenile detective.


A registered sex offender already accused of gross sexual imposition with a 9-year-old Middletown girl is now facing charges he raped an 11-year-old, according to the Butler County Prosecutor’s Office.

Clint A. Nevitt, 32, of Middletown, was indicted by a Butler County grand jury on three counts of rape and two counts of gross sexual imposition.

He allegedly paid the 11-year-old’s mother to have sex with the girl, said Middletown police Detective Fred Shuemake, who called Nevitt “one of the worst” pedophiles he’s seen in his 10 years as a juvenile detective.

The allegations came to light after the 11-year-old, who is now living with her father outside of Middletown, told a therapist about the encounters. The girl said her mother, who has not been charged with any crimes, used the money to buy drugs, Shuemake said.

In 2001, Nevitt was accused of raping a third girl, who was 12 at the time and is related to his 9-year-old accuser.

He served two years in prison and was listed in the state’s sex offender registry after he pleaded guilty to gross sexual imposition and attempted rape.

The 9-year-old girl testified in a June preliminary hearing that Nevitt paid her to touch him.

Her grandmother testified Nevitt contacted her before the allegations involving her granddaughter and asked for her help in finding him “young stuff.”

He allegedly had more success when he repeated the same request to the mother of the
11-year-old, Shuemake said.

Nevitt is being held in the Butler County Jail in lieu of a $100,000 bond. He faces up to 40 years in prison if convicted on all counts.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Clint A. Nevitt – Repeat Sex Offender Paid a mother to have sex with child

He allegedly paid the 11-year-old’s mother to have sex with the girl, said Middletown police Detective Fred Shuemake, who called Nevitt “one of the worst” pedophiles he’s seen in his 10 years as a juvenile detective.


A registered sex offender already accused of gross sexual imposition with a 9-year-old Middletown girl is now facing charges he raped an 11-year-old, according to the Butler County Prosecutor’s Office.

Clint A. Nevitt, 32, of Middletown, was indicted by a Butler County grand jury on three counts of rape and two counts of gross sexual imposition.

He allegedly paid the 11-year-old’s mother to have sex with the girl, said Middletown police Detective Fred Shuemake, who called Nevitt “one of the worst” pedophiles he’s seen in his 10 years as a juvenile detective.

The allegations came to light after the 11-year-old, who is now living with her father outside of Middletown, told a therapist about the encounters. The girl said her mother, who has not been charged with any crimes, used the money to buy drugs, Shuemake said.

In 2001, Nevitt was accused of raping a third girl, who was 12 at the time and is related to his 9-year-old accuser.

He served two years in prison and was listed in the state’s sex offender registry after he pleaded guilty to gross sexual imposition and attempted rape.

The 9-year-old girl testified in a June preliminary hearing that Nevitt paid her to touch him.

Her grandmother testified Nevitt contacted her before the allegations involving her granddaughter and asked for her help in finding him “young stuff.”

He allegedly had more success when he repeated the same request to the mother of the
11-year-old, Shuemake said.

Nevitt is being held in the Butler County Jail in lieu of a $100,000 bond. He faces up to 40 years in prison if convicted on all counts.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Billy Dan Carroll

A Travis County grand jury has indicted accused serial child predator Billy Dan Carroll on multiple charges, including aggravated sexual assault of a child and indecency with a child.

The indictments, issued late Tuesday, come as Austin police say they have completed their investigation involving Carroll.

Sgt. Brian Loyd of the child abuse investigation unit said Wednesday that police still have one victim they hope to identify from a videotape that investigators seized from Carroll’s home in Northwest Austin but that they have no way of finding her.

Carroll is accused of sexually assaulting six children, according to the indictments. He also is charged with indecency with a child by contact and indecency with a child by exposure.

Police have said they seized a videotape from Carroll’s home in which he is seen having sex with children.

Investigators have said that one of the girls was as young as 2. Carroll’s also accused of videotaping a 13-year-old girl with a hidden camera in his home and drugging a victim with a narcotic-laced slushy drink.

They said Carroll met one victim, an 8-year-old girl, through his volunteer work with Court Appointed Special Advocates of Travis County, an organization that assists children.

Carroll’s next court appearance is scheduled for Aug. 8. A judge has not decided whether Carroll, who owned a well-known court reporting business with offices in Austin and San Antonio, will receive a court-appointed attorney. Carroll has said that his wife, who has filed for divorce, and his former business partner have frozen his assets and he can’t afford counsel.

State District Judge Melissa Goodwin had declined to appoint a lawyer for Carroll and instead asked him to give her certain documents, including income tax statements. Carroll had not done so at a recent hearing.

Billy Dan Carroll

A Travis County grand jury has indicted accused serial child predator Billy Dan Carroll on multiple charges, including aggravated sexual assault of a child and indecency with a child.

The indictments, issued late Tuesday, come as Austin police say they have completed their investigation involving Carroll.

Sgt. Brian Loyd of the child abuse investigation unit said Wednesday that police still have one victim they hope to identify from a videotape that investigators seized from Carroll’s home in Northwest Austin but that they have no way of finding her.

Carroll is accused of sexually assaulting six children, according to the indictments. He also is charged with indecency with a child by contact and indecency with a child by exposure.

Police have said they seized a videotape from Carroll’s home in which he is seen having sex with children.

Investigators have said that one of the girls was as young as 2. Carroll’s also accused of videotaping a 13-year-old girl with a hidden camera in his home and drugging a victim with a narcotic-laced slushy drink.

They said Carroll met one victim, an 8-year-old girl, through his volunteer work with Court Appointed Special Advocates of Travis County, an organization that assists children.

Carroll’s next court appearance is scheduled for Aug. 8. A judge has not decided whether Carroll, who owned a well-known court reporting business with offices in Austin and San Antonio, will receive a court-appointed attorney. Carroll has said that his wife, who has filed for divorce, and his former business partner have frozen his assets and he can’t afford counsel.

State District Judge Melissa Goodwin had declined to appoint a lawyer for Carroll and instead asked him to give her certain documents, including income tax statements. Carroll had not done so at a recent hearing.

Billy Dan Carroll

A Travis County grand jury has indicted accused serial child predator Billy Dan Carroll on multiple charges, including aggravated sexual assault of a child and indecency with a child.

The indictments, issued late Tuesday, come as Austin police say they have completed their investigation involving Carroll.

Sgt. Brian Loyd of the child abuse investigation unit said Wednesday that police still have one victim they hope to identify from a videotape that investigators seized from Carroll’s home in Northwest Austin but that they have no way of finding her.

Carroll is accused of sexually assaulting six children, according to the indictments. He also is charged with indecency with a child by contact and indecency with a child by exposure.

Police have said they seized a videotape from Carroll’s home in which he is seen having sex with children.

Investigators have said that one of the girls was as young as 2. Carroll’s also accused of videotaping a 13-year-old girl with a hidden camera in his home and drugging a victim with a narcotic-laced slushy drink.

They said Carroll met one victim, an 8-year-old girl, through his volunteer work with Court Appointed Special Advocates of Travis County, an organization that assists children.

Carroll’s next court appearance is scheduled for Aug. 8. A judge has not decided whether Carroll, who owned a well-known court reporting business with offices in Austin and San Antonio, will receive a court-appointed attorney. Carroll has said that his wife, who has filed for divorce, and his former business partner have frozen his assets and he can’t afford counsel.

State District Judge Melissa Goodwin had declined to appoint a lawyer for Carroll and instead asked him to give her certain documents, including income tax statements. Carroll had not done so at a recent hearing.

Ivy Edwards – Repeat Sex Offender – Arrested for the 59th time

Edwards was arrested for the 59th time.

Sandy Banning has been waiting six years for Florida lawmakers to start protecting frail elders in nursing homes from known sexual predators.

The state Legislature considered legislation this past spring to require criminal background checks of all prospective nursing-home residents, and to deny admission to anybody with a history of sexual offenses or other violent crimes.

She will push again for the bill next year and Wednesday she is in Washington, D.C., testifying before the House Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight. The committee is examining the problem of sexual predators and offenders living side-by-side with elders and people with dementia in nursing homes.

“I’m mad. I’m mad because nothing has been done,” Banning, of Jacksonville, said.

Banning’s 77-year-old mother, Virginia Thurston, was a resident in a Jacksonville nursing home in 2002 when a sexual offender who had been arrested 58 times was placed in the home by a district court judge. A judge placed an 83-year-old man, Ivy Edwards, a repeat sex offender, in the nursing home. Edwards was believed to be wheel-chair bound.

The evening of July 23, 2002, he wheeled into Thurston’s unlocked room and used his cane to prevent anybody from being able to come in the room.

By a fluke, a nurse and a trainee were making rounds, found the locked door and entered from the next room that shared a bathroom with Thurston’s room. They discovered the man in her bed.

Banning initially was told nothing seemed to have happened. The next day, a social worker said her mother, who suffered from dementia, had been sexually assaulted. Edwards was arrested for the 59th time.

“She didn’t remember,” Banning said, who had to tell her mother what happened. “I had to take her to be examined and watch her cry.”

Nobody in the nursing home knew of the man’s history because his sexual crimes had occurred before sexual predator registration laws.

But without mandatory background checks before anyone is admitted to a nursing home in Florida, nobody knows how many sexual predators are living in nursing homes, said Wes Bledsoe, founder of the non-profit organization A Perfect Cause. His grandmother died after being victimized in an Oklahoma City nursing home in 2000. He formed the group to crusade for protecting the nation’s frail elders in long-term care facilities from sexual offenders.

Bledsoe has been pushing for state laws and federal legislation for required background checks and separate nursing homes for sexual offenders.

His research of the Medicare database and state registries for sexual offenders found 1,600 registered sex offenders were living in nursing homes in the United States. That figure, which includes 60 murders, is believed to be an underestimate because it does not include non-registered offenders who are high risk, parolees and assaults occurring inside facilities that go unreported. His research involved data from 2002 through 2006.

The state of Oklahoma passed legislation in June requiring background checks and a separate nursing home for sex offenders. The state is planning to hire a private entity to build and manage an offenders’ nursing home, Bledsoe said. Oklahoma plans to start with one facility to serve the state.

“My hope is Florida will follow Oklahoma’s lead and not just look at background checks but also separate and secure facilities,” he said.

Florida Sen. Durell Peaden Jr., R-Crestview, had co-sponsored the bill in Florida that would require background checks of all nursing home residents, which was passed by the Senate but failed in the House.

“The House will be put on notice to pass this,” Peaden said of next year’s session when he and co-sponsors will bring the Florida bill back next session. “We have to make ours more stringent. They have got to be separated.”

What it costs for the background checks and to provide a separate facility should not be a factor because the government owes it to the families of vulnerable nursing-home residents to make sure they are safe, Peaden said.

Banning is retiring later this month and said she is dedicating her time to making sure a law gets passed in Florida.

Ironically, her testimony Wednesday before the House subcommittee comes six years to the date of her mother’s assault. Her mother has since passed away.

“Families have a right to know,” she said. “(My mother’s assault) could have been prevented. I am not going to stop until there is a change.”

The purpose of the hearing is to investigate the size and scope of the problem and what role the federal government might play to stop it, U.S. Rep. Mary Fallin, R-Okla., said in a statement about organizing the hearing.

“The rare case of sexual assault and abuse that have been documented in these facilities are particularly abhorrent,” she said. “I look forward to working with our nursing homes to guarantee the kind of safe environment that our seniors and their families deserve.”

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Ivy Edwards – Repeat Sex Offender – Arrested for the 59th time

Edwards was arrested for the 59th time.

Sandy Banning has been waiting six years for Florida lawmakers to start protecting frail elders in nursing homes from known sexual predators.

The state Legislature considered legislation this past spring to require criminal background checks of all prospective nursing-home residents, and to deny admission to anybody with a history of sexual offenses or other violent crimes.

She will push again for the bill next year and Wednesday she is in Washington, D.C., testifying before the House Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight. The committee is examining the problem of sexual predators and offenders living side-by-side with elders and people with dementia in nursing homes.

“I’m mad. I’m mad because nothing has been done,” Banning, of Jacksonville, said.

Banning’s 77-year-old mother, Virginia Thurston, was a resident in a Jacksonville nursing home in 2002 when a sexual offender who had been arrested 58 times was placed in the home by a district court judge. A judge placed an 83-year-old man, Ivy Edwards, a repeat sex offender, in the nursing home. Edwards was believed to be wheel-chair bound.

The evening of July 23, 2002, he wheeled into Thurston’s unlocked room and used his cane to prevent anybody from being able to come in the room.

By a fluke, a nurse and a trainee were making rounds, found the locked door and entered from the next room that shared a bathroom with Thurston’s room. They discovered the man in her bed.

Banning initially was told nothing seemed to have happened. The next day, a social worker said her mother, who suffered from dementia, had been sexually assaulted. Edwards was arrested for the 59th time.

“She didn’t remember,” Banning said, who had to tell her mother what happened. “I had to take her to be examined and watch her cry.”

Nobody in the nursing home knew of the man’s history because his sexual crimes had occurred before sexual predator registration laws.

But without mandatory background checks before anyone is admitted to a nursing home in Florida, nobody knows how many sexual predators are living in nursing homes, said Wes Bledsoe, founder of the non-profit organization A Perfect Cause. His grandmother died after being victimized in an Oklahoma City nursing home in 2000. He formed the group to crusade for protecting the nation’s frail elders in long-term care facilities from sexual offenders.

Bledsoe has been pushing for state laws and federal legislation for required background checks and separate nursing homes for sexual offenders.

His research of the Medicare database and state registries for sexual offenders found 1,600 registered sex offenders were living in nursing homes in the United States. That figure, which includes 60 murders, is believed to be an underestimate because it does not include non-registered offenders who are high risk, parolees and assaults occurring inside facilities that go unreported. His research involved data from 2002 through 2006.

The state of Oklahoma passed legislation in June requiring background checks and a separate nursing home for sex offenders. The state is planning to hire a private entity to build and manage an offenders’ nursing home, Bledsoe said. Oklahoma plans to start with one facility to serve the state.

“My hope is Florida will follow Oklahoma’s lead and not just look at background checks but also separate and secure facilities,” he said.

Florida Sen. Durell Peaden Jr., R-Crestview, had co-sponsored the bill in Florida that would require background checks of all nursing home residents, which was passed by the Senate but failed in the House.

“The House will be put on notice to pass this,” Peaden said of next year’s session when he and co-sponsors will bring the Florida bill back next session. “We have to make ours more stringent. They have got to be separated.”

What it costs for the background checks and to provide a separate facility should not be a factor because the government owes it to the families of vulnerable nursing-home residents to make sure they are safe, Peaden said.

Banning is retiring later this month and said she is dedicating her time to making sure a law gets passed in Florida.

Ironically, her testimony Wednesday before the House subcommittee comes six years to the date of her mother’s assault. Her mother has since passed away.

“Families have a right to know,” she said. “(My mother’s assault) could have been prevented. I am not going to stop until there is a change.”

The purpose of the hearing is to investigate the size and scope of the problem and what role the federal government might play to stop it, U.S. Rep. Mary Fallin, R-Okla., said in a statement about organizing the hearing.

“The rare case of sexual assault and abuse that have been documented in these facilities are particularly abhorrent,” she said. “I look forward to working with our nursing homes to guarantee the kind of safe environment that our seniors and their families deserve.”

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Ivy Edwards – Repeat Sex Offender – Arrested for the 59th time

Edwards was arrested for the 59th time.

Sandy Banning has been waiting six years for Florida lawmakers to start protecting frail elders in nursing homes from known sexual predators.

The state Legislature considered legislation this past spring to require criminal background checks of all prospective nursing-home residents, and to deny admission to anybody with a history of sexual offenses or other violent crimes.

She will push again for the bill next year and Wednesday she is in Washington, D.C., testifying before the House Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight. The committee is examining the problem of sexual predators and offenders living side-by-side with elders and people with dementia in nursing homes.

“I’m mad. I’m mad because nothing has been done,” Banning, of Jacksonville, said.

Banning’s 77-year-old mother, Virginia Thurston, was a resident in a Jacksonville nursing home in 2002 when a sexual offender who had been arrested 58 times was placed in the home by a district court judge. A judge placed an 83-year-old man, Ivy Edwards, a repeat sex offender, in the nursing home. Edwards was believed to be wheel-chair bound.

The evening of July 23, 2002, he wheeled into Thurston’s unlocked room and used his cane to prevent anybody from being able to come in the room.

By a fluke, a nurse and a trainee were making rounds, found the locked door and entered from the next room that shared a bathroom with Thurston’s room. They discovered the man in her bed.

Banning initially was told nothing seemed to have happened. The next day, a social worker said her mother, who suffered from dementia, had been sexually assaulted. Edwards was arrested for the 59th time.

“She didn’t remember,” Banning said, who had to tell her mother what happened. “I had to take her to be examined and watch her cry.”

Nobody in the nursing home knew of the man’s history because his sexual crimes had occurred before sexual predator registration laws.

But without mandatory background checks before anyone is admitted to a nursing home in Florida, nobody knows how many sexual predators are living in nursing homes, said Wes Bledsoe, founder of the non-profit organization A Perfect Cause. His grandmother died after being victimized in an Oklahoma City nursing home in 2000. He formed the group to crusade for protecting the nation’s frail elders in long-term care facilities from sexual offenders.

Bledsoe has been pushing for state laws and federal legislation for required background checks and separate nursing homes for sexual offenders.

His research of the Medicare database and state registries for sexual offenders found 1,600 registered sex offenders were living in nursing homes in the United States. That figure, which includes 60 murders, is believed to be an underestimate because it does not include non-registered offenders who are high risk, parolees and assaults occurring inside facilities that go unreported. His research involved data from 2002 through 2006.

The state of Oklahoma passed legislation in June requiring background checks and a separate nursing home for sex offenders. The state is planning to hire a private entity to build and manage an offenders’ nursing home, Bledsoe said. Oklahoma plans to start with one facility to serve the state.

“My hope is Florida will follow Oklahoma’s lead and not just look at background checks but also separate and secure facilities,” he said.

Florida Sen. Durell Peaden Jr., R-Crestview, had co-sponsored the bill in Florida that would require background checks of all nursing home residents, which was passed by the Senate but failed in the House.

“The House will be put on notice to pass this,” Peaden said of next year’s session when he and co-sponsors will bring the Florida bill back next session. “We have to make ours more stringent. They have got to be separated.”

What it costs for the background checks and to provide a separate facility should not be a factor because the government owes it to the families of vulnerable nursing-home residents to make sure they are safe, Peaden said.

Banning is retiring later this month and said she is dedicating her time to making sure a law gets passed in Florida.

Ironically, her testimony Wednesday before the House subcommittee comes six years to the date of her mother’s assault. Her mother has since passed away.

“Families have a right to know,” she said. “(My mother’s assault) could have been prevented. I am not going to stop until there is a change.”

The purpose of the hearing is to investigate the size and scope of the problem and what role the federal government might play to stop it, U.S. Rep. Mary Fallin, R-Okla., said in a statement about organizing the hearing.

“The rare case of sexual assault and abuse that have been documented in these facilities are particularly abhorrent,” she said. “I look forward to working with our nursing homes to guarantee the kind of safe environment that our seniors and their families deserve.”

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte

Curtis Lon Canada – Repeat Sex Offender – Committed to Coalinga

Canada has been convicted of violent sex crimes three times in 22 years. Each crime involved forcing or attempts to force male victims, one of them a teen, into sex acts


A San Joaquin County Superior Court judge has ordered a Tracy man committed into the state’s custody after a jury Monday found him to be a sexually violent predator.

Curtis Canada, 42, is being sent to the Coalinga State Hospital for an indeterminate term for the appropriate treatment and confinement, which is subject to annual review by the director of mental health, according to court documents.

He has been convicted of violent sexual crimes three times since 1986.

Deputy District Attorney Victoria Boyett, who prosecuted the case, said the jury did the right thing.

“It’s unfortunate, but due to his mental disorder, he’s very dangerous to the community,” Boyett said. “He needs to be in a secure facility to protect people.”

In separate evaluation summaries through a pair of clinical psychologists last year, Canada was deemed to meet the criteria as a sexually violent predator. In two separate documents, he was diagnosed as having paraphillia, a sexual attraction of an unusual or pathological nature, and sexual sadism.

Boyett said Canada will have the opportunity to participate in an “intense” sexual offender program to help him work though some of his issues with a goal of being granted a supervised release.

“We just don’t want any more re-offenses,” she said. “It’s not punishing someone twice for the same thing; its a matter due to his mental illness. We don’t need more victims.”

Canada has spent the past 22 years in and out of prison for committing three violent sex crimes.

In 1986, he pleaded guilty to forcing a Tracy teenager to perform oral sex on him and was sentenced to two years in prison, according to court documents.

Less than a year after his release, a jury convicted him of assault with intent to commit sodomy after beating a man. He was sent to prison for seven years, court documents show.

In 2000, Canada pleaded guilty to forcible oral copulation and was given a nine-year prison sentence, but was eligible for parole in 2007, according to court documents.

“25% of all sex offenders re-offend within 15 years”
………Sarah Tofte